History Blog

Category Archives: Exhibition Notes

Exhibition Note: The Celebrated Gardens of Lyme Artists

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes, History Blog

In the cultivated wildness of their flower gardens, local artists showcased their delight in color, pattern, and form. According to The Hartford Courant in 1931, Lucian Abrams, whose paintings are lavishly displayed in the Florence Griswold Museum’s spring exhibition A Cosmopolitan in Connecticut, was one of several Lyme painters known as much “for their wonderful flowers and the studied care of their houses and grounds as for their pictures.”

Read More >

Exhibition Note: Hadlyme’s Grand Barn

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes

Surrounded by sweeping views of Hadlyme’s meadows and rock-strewn hillsides in a spacious studio created from a former stock barn, New York artist Harry Holtzman (1912-1987) created many of the pioneering modernist works displayed in the Florence Griswold Museum’s exhibition Harry Holtzman and American Abstraction. Stones collected nearby anchor his sculptural compositions quite literally in the Lyme landscape.

Read More >

Exhibition Notes: Stories in Stone

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes

Like the dramatic red-tinged cliffs of New Haven’s East Rock captured on two canvases in the exhibition Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: An Artist’s Guide to the Universe,[1] Old Lyme’s “mineral kingdom” invites exploration.

Read More >

Exhibition Notes: Lyme’s White Churches

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes

In the first decade of the 20th century when Ellen Axson Wilson summered in Old Lyme, eight white churches dotted the landscape. Together they expressed the beliefs and responded to the needs of a rapidly changing community.

Read More >

Exhibition Notes: Albany and Lyme

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes

From the Archives offers a local history perspective on Lyme’s Albany connections to accompany the Florence Griswold Museum’s summer 2012 exhibition On Hudson: Highlights from the Albany Institute of History & Art.

Read More >

Exhibition Notes: Needlework and the Education of Girls

THIS ENTRY WAS POSTED IN Exhibition Notes

by Caroline Zinsser, Ph.D. Introduction This paper will address two topics. The first is the education of American girls in the Northeast from Colonial times through the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on needlework as a way to trace that progression—particularly in Connecticut schools. The second is to describe how needlework played a part in […]

Read More >